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Wednesday, June 29

  1. page Educational Philosophy edited ... An ancient Chinese proverb says "Tell me, I forget. Show me, I remember. Involve me, I un…
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    An ancient Chinese proverb says "Tell me, I forget. Show me, I remember. Involve me, I understand.” My students will have as much practice at the English language arts as I can give them. As the proverb so wisely affirms, understanding only comes from doing something, not from listening and watching. In a language arts classroom, this means that in order for students to understand literature, they must experience it rather than simply read it and listen to it. In order to understand composition, students must put it to use as often as possible. Growth in understanding will happen with each practical experience.
    Choice
    As often as possible, I give myStudents must feel a sense of responsibility for their own behavior and learning. In classroom management, students must know the expected behaviors and the consequences for behaving otherwise. Offering students a choice amongbetween a list of assignments. Everyone learnspositive consequence for expected behavior or a little differently. It usednegative consequence for unacceptable behavior is key in setting students up to be that the only strength that matteredresponsible for their own behavior. A similar outcome occurs in school was readinglearning. If a student is given the material and passingopportunity to choose between multiple options for completing assigned outcomes, the exam. Now, we know that students can apply their unique talentsstudent has a sense of ownership over the choice and strengths to their learning process to achieve far greater results than simply memorizing terms and recalling them later. Today's technologyover the outcome. This also gives teachers andthe teacher the opportunity to offer students accessassignments that appeal to nearly limitless information and tools and can facilitate any learning style.students' multiple intelligences.
    Inclusion
    All students, regardlessRegardless of circumstance, background, or innate ability can workability, students should have the opportunity to improveexplore their learning strategy. Those who can not see can still read. Those who can not move can still write. Those who can not speak can still communicate. Every student haspotential in an interesting and satisfying way. No two people will have the capacity to learn,exact same way of interpreting their academic experience, and that fact makes the experience that much more interesting! In my classroom, I havewill make sure that everyone is included; nobody gets to disappear into the capacityshadows and be unacknowledged. Inclusion in my classroom means that there will be a sense of community where the timid student does not need to teach them.feel nervous about asking questions or answering others' questions. In my classroom, we are all students increasing our understanding through one another's insights.
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    12:27 pm
  2. page Educational Philosophy edited ... Educational Philosophy {thethinker2.jpg} Relax A relaxed environment is crucial for reach…
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    Educational Philosophy
    {thethinker2.jpg}
    Relax
    A relaxed environment is crucial for reaching one's learning potential. Anxieties
    Focus
    Anxieties
    of all sorts keepskeep students' minds
    ...
    to hand inin, to the
    ...
    in later, to what their peers are thinking about them right now. My goal is to keep students challenged and focused on the tasks at hand. In order to accomplish this:
    The students must know what they are to do. The teacher needs to provide concise description of the outcome (written, verbal,
    or any numberboth) detailing exactly what the students are to have done at the end of other thoughts. Though no classroom can be a place ofperiod.
    The students must know how they are to accomplish their task. The teacher needs to provide clear instructions (written, verbal, or both) discussing the steps required to
    complete peace, my classroom and policies will center around preventing unneeded stress and anxiety.
    Practice
    Students will have frequent opportunities
    a task.
    The students must know how long they are expected
    to practicework on a task. The teacher needs to emphasize the craftslimited amount of Language Arts in my class. Assignments don'ttime that students have to be intensely vigorous or stressful,complete a task. If a student believes he has as long as he wants to complete a task, the teacher will find him idle.
    The students must know why
    they just haveare completing a task. The teacher needs to provide tasks that are practical. The best tasks are ones that are relevant to the students' lives. Tasks must be done. Persistent writing makes better writers. Short, but frequent reading assignments makes more effective readers. A low-stress classroom and frequent practice may sound mutually exclusive, but keeping students engaged and challenged without overloading them iseasily connected to a top priority or mine.larger learning outcome rather than a disjointed task that is simply meant to take up time.
    Connect
    Reading, writing,To students, schoolwork often seems disconnected and communication skills are used in every area of a students experience. Why not makeirrelevant to their daily lives. Their school experience their assignment? Most people encounter hundredsis made up of grammaticala mass of classes and punctuation errors inassignments that appear to have little to do with one another, or anything to do with their everyday world. Every classlives outside of school. As a teacher, I want to connect students takes is a research paper opportunity. The music students listen to is filled with allusions, metaphors,the learning process by using real-life issues, information and symbols. Assignments don't have to be boring experiencesmaterials from other disciplines, and everyday experiences make for great assignments. Students can connectreflection to allow them to surround themselves with meaningful learning opportunities. The best learning happens when students care about what they learnare learning.
    Practice
    An ancient Chinese proverb says "Tell me, I forget. Show me, I remember. Involve me, I understand.” My students will have as much practice at the English language arts as I can give them. As the proverb so wisely affirms, understanding only comes from doing something, not from listening and watching. In a language arts classroom, this means that
    in my classorder for students to other classesunderstand literature, they must experience it rather than simply read it and listen to their own lives. This connection is a sign of true understanding and opens the student upit. In order to even more possibilities.understand composition, students must put it to use as often as possible. Growth in understanding will happen with each practical experience.
    Choice
    ...
    my students a a choice
    Inclusion
    All students, regardless of circumstance, background, or innate ability can work to improve their learning strategy. Those who can not see can still read. Those who can not move can still write. Those who can not speak can still communicate. Every student has the capacity to learn, and I have the capacity to teach them.
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    11:04 am

Tuesday, April 26

  1. page Resume (deleted) edited
    5:49 pm
  2. page Short Story - Omelas edited ... Participation in discussion, written responses, reading worksheets, and drawing worksheets wil…
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    Participation in discussion, written responses, reading worksheets, and drawing worksheets will all serve as evidence of understanding for this lesson.
    Works Cited
    ...
    Curriculum, and
    the
    the Profession. Chicago:
    ...
    Fiction, Poetry,
    Drama,
    Drama, and Writing.
    ...
    instructional units. Portsmouth,
    NH:
    Portsmouth,NH: Heinemann, 2008.
    ...
    Hayden Christensen,
    Natalie
    Natalie Portman. Movie
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    5:43 pm
  3. page Short Story - Omelas edited ... 0 Instructions: Draw a scene from the story in the space provided. Underneath, write a few li…
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    Instructions: Draw a scene from the story in the space provided. Underneath, write a few lines explaining what your drawing represents in the story.
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    Lesson Rationale:
    This lesson falls withing the week of the unit in which we are studying setting in short stories. The goals of this lesson are to get the student to recognize the elements of setting in visual text as well as written text, and to apply those elements as they find meaning within the text.
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    5:42 pm
  4. page Short Story - Omelas edited Back to Short Story Unit The Ones Who Walk Away from Omelas by Usula LeGuin - Lesson Plan test …
    Back to Short Story Unit
    The Ones Who Walk Away from Omelas by Usula LeGuin - Lesson Plan
    test
    Day 13 – Lesson Plan
    English Education Lesson Plan Template Name: Mick Vickroy
    Unit/Topical Essential Questions:
    What is of value in a person?
    000000000000000000000000000000000
    Unit Understandings:
    * StudentsStudents will understand
    Students will understand how to use active reading strategies to get the most benefit from their reading.
    Standard Specifically Addressed:
    * StandardStandard 1: Students
    Active reading strategies will be used to improve understanding of the text.
    Students will interpret the text and make connections to their background information.
    ...
    Students will evaluate the information in a text to answer questions and solve problems.
    Evidence of Understanding (formative or summative: What tools or methods will you employ to determine how well students have met the objective):
    * ParticipationParticipation in class
    Visual representations of setting based on text is evidence of student's ability to visualize a setting in a written text.
    Written explanation of how the drawing represents the setting in the text is evidence of students understanding of the elements of setting.
    Written discussion of how the setting gives clues to the values exhibited in the story is evidence of the student's ability to interpret the setting to find deeper meaning in a story.
    Objective for Lesson:
    * RecognizeRecognize elements of
    Visualize a setting in a written text.
    Interpret the setting to find deeper meaning in a story.
    ----
    Learning Experience Sequence (hook/anticipatory set, accessing prior knowledge, instructional techniques, utilization of technology, modeling, check for understanding, guided practice, independent practice, feedback, homework, closure):
    * MiniMini Lesson (10
    Opener: Students will watch a movie trailer, or several different trailers, for Star Wars: Episode 3, Revenge of the Sith.
    Discuss place, mood, and social elements of setting.
    ...
    Read Aloud (15 min)
    Students will complete a worksheet prompting them through their before reading strategy.
    ...
    by Ursula Le Guin,LeGuin, for the
    After a few paragraphs, switch to another student, and continue switching students until all have read or the story is finished.
    Students should be actively reading and completing a during reading worksheet as they go, or when they finish.
    ...
    difficulty of the language used in the story from the first few lines or from the parts you
    skimmed? How long might it take you to read this story?
    During Reading:Reading Graphic Organizer:
    Characters
    0000000000000000000000000000
    Plot or Situation
    000000000000000000000000
    Elements of Setting
    000000000000000000000000000000
    Points of Interest (Quotes, Unfamiliar Words, Questions, etc.)
    0
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    Instructions: Draw a scene from the story in the space provided. Underneath, write a few lines explaining what your drawing represents in the story.
    Lesson Rationale:
    This lesson falls withing the week of the unit in which we are studying setting in short stories. The goals of this lesson are to get the student to recognize the elements of setting in visual text as well as written text, and to apply those elements as they find meaning within the text.
    The video clip is meant to help students recognize setting in a visual text.
    The drawing activity is intended to encourage students to visualize the setting in the written text.
    The writing prompt asks the students to think about how the setting affects the meaning of the text.
    The opener is a video clip of Star Wars: Episode 3, Revenge of the Sith, which is accessing contemporary material that will, hopefully, serve as an anticipatory set to engage the students in the following activity. The science fiction opener may also set the stage for the science fiction story we will be reading afterward.
    This lesson includes several different activities that are all used to achieve the stated objectives.
    The activities are meant to meet the needs of diverse learners as identified by Gardner's theory of multiple intelligences (Smagorinski, 17-18).
    Visual learners are engaged by the movie preview, and are applying their knowledge of setting to find meaning in the preview.
    Linguistic learners will access the written text and relate to LeGuin's description of the setting to find meaning in the text.
    Struggling readers' needs are met by reading the text aloud in class. It is rather short and should not take much class time to complete.
    The drawing and writing activities should meet the needs of all students, but especially the visual and linguistic learners.
    The writing prompt exercise relates the text to the essential question and encourages students to think interpersonally and intrapersonally.
    Before and during reading worksheets adapted from Appendix A of Burke's The English Teacher's Companion (501).
    Participation in discussion, written responses, reading worksheets, and drawing worksheets will all serve as evidence of understanding for this lesson.
    Works Cited
    Burke, Jim. The English Teacher's Companion, Third Edition A Complete Guide to Classroom, Curriculum, and
    the Profession. Chicago: Heinemann, 2008. Print.
    Le Guin, Ursula. "The Ones Who Walk Away from Omelas." Literature: An Introduction to Fiction, Poetry,
    Drama, and Writing. 5th ed. New York: Pearson, 2007. 225-30. Print.
    Smagorinsky, Peter. Teaching English by design how to create and carry out instructional units. Portsmouth,
    NH: Heinemann, 2008. Print.
    Star Wars: Episode 3, Revenge of the Sith. Dir. George Lucas. Perf. Ewan McGregor, Hayden Christensen,
    Natalie Portman. Movie List. Web. 15 Nov. 2009. <http://www.movie-list.com/trailers.php?id=starwars3>.

    (view changes)
    5:38 pm
  5. page Short Story - Omelas edited ... The Ones Who Walk Away from Omelas by Usula LeGuin - Lesson Plan test Day 13 – Lesson Plan …
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    The Ones Who Walk Away from Omelas by Usula LeGuin - Lesson Plan
    test
    Day 13 – Lesson Plan
    English Education Lesson Plan Template Name: Mick Vickroy
    Unit/Topical Essential Questions:
    What is of value in a person?
    Unit Understandings:
    * Students will understand how plot, setting, and characterization function in short fiction.
    Students will understand how to use active reading strategies to get the most benefit from their reading.
    Standard Specifically Addressed:
    * Standard 1: Students read and understand a variety of materials.
    Active reading strategies will be used to improve understanding of the text.
    Students will interpret the text and make connections to their background information.
    Standard 4: Students apply thinking skills to their reading, writing, speaking, listening, and viewing.
    Students will infer information from viewing a movie trailer.
    Students will evaluate the information in a text to answer questions and solve problems.
    Evidence of Understanding (formative or summative: What tools or methods will you employ to determine how well students have met the objective):
    * Participation in class discussion regarding setting in a movie preview is evidence of student's ability to recognize the elements of setting in a visual text.
    Visual representations of setting based on text is evidence of student's ability to visualize a setting in a written text.
    Written explanation of how the drawing represents the setting in the text is evidence of students understanding of the elements of setting.
    Written discussion of how the setting gives clues to the values exhibited in the story is evidence of the student's ability to interpret the setting to find deeper meaning in a story.
    Objective for Lesson:
    * Recognize elements of setting in visual text.
    Visualize a setting in a written text.
    Interpret the setting to find deeper meaning in a story.
    Learning Experience Sequence (hook/anticipatory set, accessing prior knowledge, instructional techniques, utilization of technology, modeling, check for understanding, guided practice, independent practice, feedback, homework, closure):
    * Mini Lesson (10 min)
    Opener: Students will watch a movie trailer, or several different trailers, for Star Wars: Episode 3, Revenge of the Sith.
    Discuss place, mood, and social elements of setting.
    Access students' background knowledge of the Star Wars universe to help them make the connections between the activities they witness in the preview and their meaning in the story. Students don't necessarily need to know the story lines of Star Wars to recognize significant meanings from the preview.
    Examples might be the recognition of a war taking place, so the story takes place during a long war. They might see the Jedi temples appear in the preview, so they'll know that spirituality plays a part in the story. Some students might connect the robots to a form of slavery, and suggest that a social revolution is at hand.
    Show the clip again. Having seen the preview a second time, students will discuss the elements of setting that they recognized. The may mention space, the distant past, temples, war, slavery, etc.
    The clip may be shown more than once to ensure all students have recognized an element of setting.
    If students are having trouble pointing out elements, model by making a few suggestions (such as those listed above).
    Read Aloud (15 min)
    Students will complete a worksheet prompting them through their before reading strategy.
    Start off reading The Ones Who Walk Away from Omelas, by Ursula Le Guin, for the students so they can listen and begin to understand the story clearly.
    After a few paragraphs, switch to another student, and continue switching students until all have read or the story is finished.
    Students should be actively reading and completing a during reading worksheet as they go, or when they finish.
    Activity (10-15 min)
    Students will draw a scene from the story.
    Students will write a few sentences explaining why they chose that scene and what each part of their drawing represents.
    If students are having difficulty coming up with an idea, go back through some of the text and help them find one.
    Activity (10 min)
    Students will respond to the writing prompt: What does the setting of the story tell you about the inhabitants values? Do you believe they value the suffering child? Why or why not?
    This particular short story is almost all setting, so there is little characterization or plot to detract from the student's focus on setting.
    This activity is meant to make the students consider the text in relation to the essential question.
    Differentiation (Adaptations, extensions):
    Lesson Plan Supplements:
    The Ones Who Walk Away from Omelas – by Ursula LeGuin
    Before Reading:
    What does the title suggest about the story?
    What background knowledge can you use about this subject? For example, what reasons
    do you know of that cause people to walk away from something?
    What is your purpose for reading this story? Come up with your own question, and not
    just “I'm reading this because my teacher told me to.” What recent discussions or ideas
    could you keep in mind as you read this story?
    Preview the story. How long is it? What information did you glean about the setting and
    difficulty of the language used in the story from the first few lines or from the parts you
    skimmed? How long might it take you to read this story?
    During Reading:
    Characters
    Plot or Situation
    Elements of Setting
    Points of Interest (Quotes, Unfamiliar Words, Questions, etc.)

    (view changes)
    5:29 pm

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